The Problem With Pictures

I have a problem. A problem with pictures to be exact. I don’t like them. It’s strange, I know, but hear me out for a minute more.

Pictures meant to be you, and in a sense they are, but they’re so…lacking. They’re lacking to the point it is no longer you. It is simply a frame, a mere moment, of you. We, as people, are made of life. Life is made up of movement.

You are three things. Your thoughts/speech, your actions, and the motions of which you perform these actions. A picture merely shows your appearance, occasionally giving clues as to what you do, for example: A picture of someone doing a hobby of theirs, ie swimming, horseback riding, hiking, playing chess or videogames, etc. But they don’t show the movement, and how you move is a huge portion as to who you are. It says a lot about you.

If I want to see you, I want to see you in person, to FaceTime with you, to see a video. Pictures give no credit.

However, we see pictures everywhere. Our society seems to be built upon it. You see them in magazines, all over the internet, Instagram, Facebook, Google. The billboards on roads and in NewYork, backgrounds to electronic media. Before you even open a book, you look at a picture, aka the cover. Before pictures, there was paintings and portraits. There were cavemen drawing upon the walls, telling their stories.

Pictures in themselves are fine. They’re a form of art, and art is one of the most tremedously magnificent things ever thought. But, mindless selfies with no meaning behind them other than “This is my face” bother me. If I want to know about you, I want to know about you, not what you generally look like. Tell me about that later, but first let me appreciate you for you.

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